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silverstarter
09-02-2011, 10:38 AM
Hi I have recently found a 2010 1 coin with the "D" missing from the word pound on the shield side of the coin. I have checked that the design, measurements and weight are correct, so I dont think its a fake. I have also looked at it under a scope and there are no signs that it has been scratched or chipped off.
I would be greatful if anyone has any information on this. I have done a quick search on google and cant find anything.
Im at work at the minute so cant post any pics. Sorry if this is the wrong board.

silverstarter
09-02-2011, 11:17 AM
If I can get out of work soon I will pop down to a local coin dealer that wants to have a look. If not it will be tomorrow. Will let you all know what I find out since you all seem so interested lol.

Silver Bull 1
09-02-2011, 11:21 AM
Is It a Silver coin? :confused:

silverstarter
09-02-2011, 11:22 AM
No just a common/or not so circulated fiat coin.

silverstarter
09-02-2011, 11:23 AM
I posted here aswell as numistics as there is alot more traffic here.

Silver Bull 1
09-02-2011, 11:25 AM
I posted here aswell as numistics as there is alot more traffic here.

This may help-- alot of good reference material-- Good Luck!

http://en.numista.com/catalogue/pays.php

silverstarter
09-02-2011, 11:48 AM
thanks anyway, but the coin is not listed there. It is a current circulated 1 coin. A couple of years ago there was a few thousand 20p pieces put into circulation with no date on. The mint will buy them back off you for 100 now. So im hoping this might be worth something.

030206163
09-02-2011, 11:57 AM
I would expect it's rare and worth something KEEP IT!!!!!

Silver Bull 1
09-02-2011, 12:03 PM
thanks anyway, but the coin is not listed there. It is a current circulated 1 coin. A couple of years ago there was a few thousand 20p pieces put into circulation with no date on. The mint will buy them back off you for 100 now. So im hoping this might be worth something.

That is Interesting-- Why would the mint care about that? If you can sell it for that-- Do It!

030206163
09-02-2011, 01:26 PM
That is Interesting-- Why would the mint care about that? If you can sell it for that-- Do It!

It would not be the mint so much as coin collectors that would be interested. For example a run of the mill 1991 Canadian quarter (with no silver content) is worth about $30 depending on condition why? simply because the mint was on strike so not too many were made. With that said I'd expect any defective coin to be worth even more because it would be even more rare. As i said before KEEP IT!

Silver Bull 1
09-02-2011, 02:10 PM
It would not be the mint so much as coin collectors that would be interested. For example a run of the mill 1991 Canadian quarter (with no silver content) is worth about $30 depending on condition why? simply because the mint was on strike so not too many were made. With that said I'd expect any defective coin to be worth even more because it would be even more rare. As i said before KEEP IT!

I understand numismatics. It would be nice if the market for them would maintain and grow. Sadly, I feel that in this economy the market will decline--

A decline that could last for 10+ years

I have been a collector for 0ver 10 years.
I have a hoard of silver numismatics that I will be selling soon. For this reason.

Silver Beagle
09-02-2011, 02:18 PM
Correct me if I am wrong but I believe for it to be valuable there would have to be more of them found. In order to be proven the mint ran a few before finding the error. Having just one of a kind could be passed off as a mistake coin and of no numismatic value. I have a jefferson gold dollar that winks at you. The left eye wasn't hard pressed as the other eye. So its softer looking and will wink at you when changing the light reflecting on it. I showed it to a couple of NGC coin dealers and none made an offer even. They were kind of unimpressed even when put next to a perfectly struck coin. but, that's what one of them told me was to hope that more would be found and recognized as a real error coin.

030206163
09-02-2011, 02:31 PM
Correct me if I am wrong but I believe for it to be valuable there would have to be more of them found. In order to be proven the mint ran a few before finding the error. Having just one of a kind could be passed off as a mistake coin and of no numismatic value. I have a jefferson gold dollar that winks at you. The left eye wasn't hard pressed as the other eye. So its softer looking and will wink at you when changing the light reflecting on it. I showed it to a couple of NGC coin dealers and none made an offer even. They were kind of unimpressed even when put next to a perfectly struck coin. but, that's what one of them told me was to hope that more would be found and recognized as a real error coin.

If its a legit mistake by the mint it will be worth something how much it depends on how old the coin is and how dramatic. considering it's only a D (i think he said was missing) I do expect much of a premium for it right now, but 50-100 years from now it might be big bucks. The way i look a collectibles is if its small and not going to give me a big payout i'll keep it for the next generation.

dacrunch
09-02-2011, 04:45 PM
It would not be the mint so much as coin collectors that would be interested. For example a run of the mill 1991 Canadian quarter (with no silver content) is worth about $30 depending on condition why? simply because the mint was on strike so not too many were made. With that said I'd expect any defective coin to be worth even more because it would be even more rare. As i said before KEEP IT!

When I was 5 years old & Trick-or-Treating, a lady at a house I visited had forgotten it was Halloween... so she went into her hubby's trousers and gave me a penny...

Once home, my older brother, a coin collector, took one look at it and "confiscated" it from me.

It was a 1955 "double-die" U.S. penny. the press had stamped twice, so it read 11995555...

Worth quite a lot more than its original value for collectors, 56 years later... Good for him... :rolleyes:

roscoag
09-02-2011, 04:56 PM
It could be the result of "grease" or other foreign objects getting stunk in the die.
Read up on the 1922 no mint mark Lincoln penny and you can get a feel for all the different things that could cause this error.

Figment
09-02-2011, 06:04 PM
it's only worth what you can get paid for, some of that stuff doesn't pan out
however , the best to you