Home Site Map

 
Go Back   Kitco Forums > The Markets > The Economy, Banking, Markets and Global Stocks discussion group
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 02-22-2012, 02:37 AM
silvercanuck's Avatar
silvercanuck silvercanuck is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 1,954
Question S&P 90 Original Components

Anyone know where I can find out what were the original components for the S&P 90 (c. 1920+)? Prices would be great too!

Thanks in advance.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 02-24-2012, 09:59 AM
silvercanuck's Avatar
silvercanuck silvercanuck is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 1,954
Default

ANYONE have ANYTHING?!?

I've been scrounging for a week+ and haven't turned up anything except the 90 contained '50 industrial, 20 rail road, 20 utility' stocks.

I'll keep looking....
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 02-26-2012, 05:37 AM
Silvercoin's Avatar
Silvercoin Silvercoin is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 7,272
Default

why are you looking for it ?
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 02-26-2012, 11:33 AM
silvercanuck's Avatar
silvercanuck silvercanuck is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 1,954
Default

I want to figure out basically what it would have cost someone to buy equal weightings of all the stocks in the '90' back in the Twenties. I don't think ANY of the companies exist any more (perhaps just GM? GE? I don't know...).

I'm compiling a research paper of sorts to give to a financial industry "professional" to demonstrate how reality differs from his own thoughts on the matter.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 02-26-2012, 12:05 PM
dacrunch's Avatar
dacrunch dacrunch is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 8,250
Default

google search:

The origins of the Standard & Poor's 500 Index go back to 1923, when S&P presented a series of indices that included 233 companies grouped into 26 industries.

In 1957 S&P introduced the 500 and has expanded its representation over the years to encompass approximately 90 specific industry groups. Four major industry sectors have also been developed: Industrials, Utilities, Financials, and Transportation. The number of companies in each major industry sector has been allowed to "float" since 1988 in order to enable the S&P Index Committee to react efficiently to an increasingly dynamic economy and stock market.

also wiki:

Before 1957, its primary daily stock market index was the "S&P 90", a value-weighted index based on 90 stocks. Standard & Poor's also published a weekly ...
__________________
Anything that is printed on this page is purely fictional, and is in the context of an alternate virtual reality in a parallel universe. I, myself, am a fictional character! Any statements which appear to have a resemblance to real people or institutions or events, past, present or future, are unintentional and the result of pure coincidence.



Proud of my tin-foil hat - this is pride of something EARNED (I'm a self-made "nut"!) - and anything I may say should be taken in this context!

Last edited by dacrunch : 02-26-2012 at 12:17 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 02-26-2012, 12:16 PM
silvercanuck's Avatar
silvercanuck silvercanuck is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 1,954
Default

The S&P 90 was the DAILY index that was used.

The underlying '233' was just that, underlying.
Records were kept but they were not used as a general indicator.
From 1923 to 1957 more and more companies were added to the '233' until the transition from the '90' to the roll out of the full-blown S&P 500.

As posted earlier: "the 90 contained '50 industrial, 20 rail road, 20 utility' stocks."

What were these 90???
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 02-26-2012, 12:23 PM
dacrunch's Avatar
dacrunch dacrunch is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 8,250
Default

try this?

http://cowles.econ.yale.edu/P/cm/m03-2/index.htm
__________________
Anything that is printed on this page is purely fictional, and is in the context of an alternate virtual reality in a parallel universe. I, myself, am a fictional character! Any statements which appear to have a resemblance to real people or institutions or events, past, present or future, are unintentional and the result of pure coincidence.



Proud of my tin-foil hat - this is pride of something EARNED (I'm a self-made "nut"!) - and anything I may say should be taken in this context!
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 02-26-2012, 12:24 PM
Carpenter's Avatar
Carpenter Carpenter is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 10,297
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by silvercanuck View Post
Anyone know where I can find out what were the original components for the S&P 90 (c. 1920+)? Prices would be great too!

Thanks in advance.
The Wall Street Journal was first published in 1889.

Perhaps the records you seek can be found in their archives.

http://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/wsj/advancedsearch.html

Edit: looks promising, but it'll cost to find out.
http://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/wsj/resu...st=stock_quote
__________________
http://i573.photobucket.com/albums/ss171/KitcoKontests/Trophies/Single%20Trophies/GoldTrophy4.jpg$X5

"Like liberty, gold never stays were it is undervalued."

Limit politicians to two terms. One in office and one in jail.

Last edited by Carpenter : 02-26-2012 at 12:34 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 02-26-2012, 12:49 PM
silvercanuck's Avatar
silvercanuck silvercanuck is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 1,954
Default

Know the Cowles, it's just all index numbers, no individial names or prices.

Yeah, the WSJ is $$$!

It's very bizzare that the financial industry would constantly quote things like "The long term return since 1900 of the S&P 500 is 10%" when, it would seem, there are NO records of the original index composition!!!

I'll keep searching...
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 02-27-2012, 04:08 AM
Silvercoin's Avatar
Silvercoin Silvercoin is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 7,272
Default

well obviously there was no Microsoft back then so what would be the point of even making the comparison. The composition would be ever changing all the way through.

Its just a broad measure of the large companies (industries) in the economy. You wouldn't be able to measure apples to apples from then to now.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:29 AM.


Copyright@ 2007 Kitco Inc.